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The myth of Mae Phosop, rice goddess of Thailand

Worshipping goddesses like Mae Phosop, the rice goddess, has been part of Thai culture and tradition since prehistoric times.

Culture
By Sirinya Pakditawan

Sunday 28 April 2019, 03:00PM


Photo (left): Heiko S  / Flickr. Image (right): devata.org

Photo (left): Heiko S / Flickr. Image (right): devata.org

Even though the role of female deities be­came subservient since the introduction of male-dominated faiths such as Hinduism, Brahmanism and the official religion Buddhism, the power of the matriarchal spirit has al­ways played an important role in Thai­land. She is also known as Mae Khwan Khao, the ‘Mother of Rice Prosperity’.

Mae Phosop is considered the spirit or soul of rice, the main staple of the Thai diet. Thus, it is a common belief that without rice, a person cannot sus­tain and live long. The myth and legend of the rice goddess says she is badly mistreated by an old widow. Hence, she flees and finds shelter with a friend. This friend is a fish that leads the goddess into the deep forest where no human being can find and reach her.

As a consequence, all human be­ings begin to suffer from the absence of Phosop and try all that is humanly possible to find her. Finally, the fish advises the goddess to return to the humans because the next Lord Buddha will soon come to the world. Thus, the blessing of the rice goddess is needed since the Buddha will not be able to fulfil his duty on earth without Mae Phosop. Hence, she comes back to the community of mankind to stay forever. However, before her return, the goddess asks human beings to promise to treat her with respect forever after. In return she promises to bring abundant crops to mankind. Man keeps his word and so does Mae Phosop.

This story explains Thai fertility rites concerning the cultivation of rice. Thus, we may be justified in claiming that the relationship between humans and the ‘soul’ of rice is mutually de­pendent. Hence, there is also a saying that ‘The virtues of rice are 69, while the virtues of the Lord Buddha are only 59’. This proverb speaks for itself, and what is more, it also seems to point out the conflict between animistic beliefs and Buddhism. In addition, it reveals an intrinsic connection and relationship between mankind and what sustains its source of life.

When the spirit of the rice goddess is invocated, the person who performs the rite will address the spirit with sweet, kind and respectful words. The invoca­tion runs as follows: ‘Dear Spirit of Rice, Mother Phosi, Mother Phosop, Mother of the Nine Stars, Mother Chanthewi, Mother Si Dusada, come, please, come’

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Mae Phosop is addressed by the title of mother (mae) who provides food for her children (mankind). Thus, people are her children and they treat her with respect as they would their natural mother. According to Thai tradition, children are also taught to wai – put their hands in the position of obeisance and respect – after finishing their meal.

Summing up, we may say that on the one hand, the myth of the rice goddess shows how animistic and Buddhist belief were combined in the past. On the other hand, it also reveals mankind’s dependency on a good rice harvest. Hence, people feel grateful to the rice goddess and behave respect­fully towards her.


Sirinya Pakditawan is a ‘luk kreung’, or half-Thai, born and raised in Hamburg, Germany. She enjoys writing about Thailand, with a focus is on culture, art, history, tradition and on the people, as well as a mix of topics concerning Thai popular culture, travelogues and articles about Thai food.

Sirinya’s aim is not only to entertain you but to provide you with information and facts about Thailand, its culture and history that may not be generally known, in particular to the Western world. She has a PhD in American Studies from the University of Hamburg. 

To read the original story, and many more, be sure to check out Sirinya’s blog: www.sirinyas-thailand.de

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